CSI-R for 2nd Grade: Limited Resources-From Sheep to Sweaters

In this lesson, created by Rachel Pages of Pinellas County, FL, and Deborah Kozdras of the USF Stavros Center, students learn how people make choices  based on limited resources. This lesson, in two parts, uses a paired fiction and non-fiction text. 

Part 1: Fiction Text: Charlie Needs a Cloak

C– Choose your Content

Recognize –people make choices because of limited resources.

•Essential Question:

Why did Charlie need a new cloak? What did he choose to do to solve this problem (of limited resources)?

Sample Disciplinary Vocabulary:   Scarcity, choices, resources

S-Select the Standards CCSS Standards for Literacy: RL.2.1, RL.2.2, RL2.4,W2.2

NGSSS Standards for Economics:  

I-Identify texts & text-dependent questions for Investigation

Use Charlie Needs a Cloak by Tomie dePaula. You can also use the PBS video version.

Before Reading: Discuss the text. What kind of text is this? (fiction). Who is the author? When do you think this story took place?

While you read, ask the following text-dependent questions:

1)What is Charlie’s problem? (needs a new cloak)

2)Why does he want a new cloak? Does he have a new cloak? When we don’t have something we want, we say we have scarce or limited resources. What resource was limited for Charlie?

3) Charlie has to make a choice to solve his problem of scarce resources. What does he decide to do?

4) What natural resources does Charlie need to make his cloak? (As you read, have students search for evidence of resources that are needed to make the cloak). What are some of the capital resources (tools) Charlie needs? What are the human resources (jobs) that are required to make the cloak?

R-Reporting options

Reporting, considered as a Performance Task, is an essential part of CCSS. The reporting must be tied to the essential question in a CSI-R lesson.

  1. Fold the paper hamburger style. On one side label the page “Charlie’s Problem.” On the other side, label the page “Charlie’s solution.” Using the evidence gathered from the text  students draw a picture and write a sentence or two explaining Charlie’s problem with limited or scarce resources on one side and the solution he chose-to make the cloak-on the other side. Students should use the vocabulary of economics: scarce resources, wants, needs, choices.
  2. As an extension, students can label the different kinds of resources (natural, human, capital) on their diagrams.
  3. For extension questions and ideas for interdisciplinary lessons, see the following:
    1. KidsEconPosters Literature Connection for Charlie Needs a Cloak
    2. Patterns for story retelling
    3. Excellent Interdisciplinary Lesson for Charlie, including sequencing cards

Part 2: Non-fiction: Then and Now

C– Choose your Content

Recognize –people make choices because of limited resources.

Recognize – people supply goods and services based on consumer demands.

•Essential Questions:

I want a sweater now! What natural, capital (tools), and human (workers) are needed to go from sheep to sweater? How is this different from Charlie’s experience?

Sample Disciplinary Vocabulary:   Scarcity, choices, resources

S-Select the Standards

CCSS Standards for Literacy: RL.2.1, RL.2.2, RL2.4,W2.2

NGSSS Standards for Economics:  

I-Identify texts & text-dependent questions for Investigation

Use this How It’s Made Video and From Sheep to Sweater by Liza Paul (available online)to have students identify how people supply goods and services to produce sweaters. How do they go from Sheep to Sweaters?

Before Reading: Ask students to use their own written texts from Part 1. They review how the wool went from sheep to Charlie’s cloak. Ask students if they could make a cloak from sheep in the classroom? Why? What is scarce? Do we have the natural resources (sheep/wool)? Do we have the human resources (workers/skills)? Do we have the capital resources (tools/equipment)? No. We have limited resources to make sweaters! So now as you view the video and read the text, discover how different workers solve the problem of these limited resources. Let’s see how people supply goods and services to satisfy the want of a sweater! Every time you see a resource (workers, tools, natural resources), give a thumbs up and we will stop to discuss the resource.

During Reading: Students determine stopping points, unless they miss some of the key resources. Record their responses on chart paper/board, etc. They can also take notes in a little notebook. Your questions can help guide their understanding of steps in the process.

After Reading: Discussion questions should help students identify the steps, but also the interactions between the steps. At each step, what choices were made? What goods/services were needed at each step to satisfy consumer wants?

Other Informational Texts:

From Sheep to Sweater by Robin Nelson

Real Men Wear Wool as an informational text.

Sheep USA (especially pages 12-14)

Activities for text From Sheep to Sweater (by Liza Paul but fit other texts)

R-Reporting options

Reporting, considered as a Performance Task, is an essential part of CCSS. The reporting must be tied to the essential question in a CSI-R lesson. I want a sweater now! What natural, capital (tools), and human (workers) are needed to go from sheep to sweater? How is this different from Charlie’s experience?

  1. Label a piece of paper “From Sheep to Sweater” and have students describe the processes required to satisfy the limited resources of having a sweater.  They label the steps and describe the differences between Charlie’s self-production and what happens today when people specialize with different jobs to satisfy wants. Students should use the vocabulary of economics: scarce resources, wants, needs, choices.
  2. As an alternative performance task, students can use an Interactive Whiteboard App (Like Show Me) to write and describe what they learned. Alternate similar digital tasks include using a movie making program (iMovie, MovieMaker, etc.) or slide show (PowerPoint) to label and narrate a text that describes the processes and answers the questions.

Extension/Substitution Ideas

Goat in the Rug by Charles Blood and Martin Link as told by Geraldine – Use this text to match with or substitute for Charlie Needs a Cloak. The text provides a similar construct: progressing from the natural resources of the goat hair to a final product of a rug. If you want to match it with an informational text, use the Goat in the Rug informational text from the American Sheep Industry

1) Comprehension Questions with answers for Goat in the Rug from KidsEconPosters

2) Economics Lesson from the Federal Reserve for Goat in the Rug. 

3) Econ. Lesson from EconEd.org with little book of Goat in the Rug

4) Excellent informational texts and lesson ideas to use with Goat in the Rug are provided by the American Sheep Industry

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CSI-R Kindergarten: Jobs and Tools

In this lesson, created by Deborah Kozdras of the USF Stavros Center, students learn about workers, the jobs they do, and the tools/equipment they use.

C– Choose your Content

Describe: different kinds of jobs that people do and the tools or equipment used.

•Essential Question:

What are some jobs people do? What tools or equipment do they use in their jobs?

Sample Disciplinary Vocabulary:   Worker, job, tools, equipment

S-Select the Standards CCSS Standards for Literacy: RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.7, WK.2

NGSSS Standards for Economics:  SS.K.E.1.1 Standard 1: Beginning Economics. Describe different kinds of jobs that people do and the tools or equipment used.

I-Identify texts & text-dependent questions for Investigation

Choose at least two of the “text” choices below to engage your students in conducting research to answer the question: What are some of the jobs people do and what tools/equipment do they use? Students use recording notebooks to make notes about the jobs they see people do and the tools/equipment necessary for the jobs.

 Before Reading: Ask students to pay attention as you read to see if they can figure out the jobs people do and the tools they are using when they do those jobs.

During Reading: Students point out the tools and equipment on each page.

After Reading: Students draw & label jobs and the tools used that they found in the story/interactive

Text 1: Read one book from Scholastic Community Club Books about workers together. Then assign students into small groups to read/listen to another book and record the jobs & tools they found in their book. After reading, they share the information.

Text 2: Watch one PBS Mr. Rogers Videos about how common items are made,  together. Then students join in groups to watch another video and record the jobs/tools they see used.

Text 3: reading the first chapter of the book, What Do People Do All Day? By Richard Scarry (available online). Record jobs and tools.

Text 4: Use the Richard Scarry BusyTown Mysteries.  While navigating through BusyTown, students search for jobs and the tools/equipment used. They add these to their recording notebooks. 

R-Reporting options

Reporting, considered as a Performance Task, is an essential part of CCSS. The reporting must be tied to the essential question in a CSI-R lesson. You may wish to use the rigorous writing task, based on LDC Template Tasks:

“After reading/viewing some of the texts on workers, create a little book with pictures and words that describes the workers’ jobs and the tools or equipment they use. Use what you find in the texts to create your book.”

  1. While students are investigating the texts, they use their recording notebooks to draw/write about the jobs/tools they experience in the different texts.
  2. Each student chooses their one favorite page in their booklet to share with the class. As they share, they describe the job and the tools. Then they tell the audience why they chose that particular job as their favorite.
  3. Extension: Students interview two or three adults about their jobs and the tools and equipment they use. If they have a mobile device, they can videotape the interviews. Otherwise, they can record their findings to bring back to school to share.
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CSI-R 1st Grade: Why is Saving Important?

In this lesson, created by Angela Mullaney of Pinellas County, FL. and Deborah Kozdras of the USF Stavros Center, students learn the importance of saving. There are three options for text: BrainPop video, Will Saves for the Stars online free digital book, and/or A Chair for my Mother. After sharing one or more texts, students create a talk-show script, which they perform (and possibly video-tape).

C– Choose your Content

Essential Question: Why is saving money for future purchases important? SS.1.E.1.5

Sample Disciplinary Vocabulary:   Saving, money, purchases, earn

S-Select the Standards

CCSS Standards for Literacy: RL.1.1, RL.1.2, W1.2

NGSSS Standards for Economics:  

SS.1.E. 1.5 Recognize the importance of saving money for future purchases.

I-Identify texts & text-dependent questions for Investigation

BrainPop: Saving and Spending: (if you have access or you could get temporary access)

Screen Shot 2013-08-15 at 3.37.21 PM

Scaffold Student Investigation Before, During, & After by conducting a Read Aloud/Think Aloud. Attend to the images and text when prompting students.

Sample Text-Dependent Questions:

•In the beginning, what item does Annie hope to purchase with the money she and her classmates are saving? SS.1.E.1.5

•Why is it important for Annie and her classmates to save their money?

•How can people earn money? S.1.E.1.1

•Does Mia know how to save?  How do you know? SS.1.E.1.5

•Is Annie responsible with her money?  How do you know? Give examples from the video.  RL.1.3     W.1.1

•Based on what you saw in this video, do you think it is important to save your money for future purchases.  Why or why not.  Site examples and evidence from the video.  SS.1.E.1.5    W.1.1

Alternate or Additional Text # 2:

Screen Shot 2013-08-15 at 3.43.15 PM

Sample Questions:

1) Read page 11 and decide why the author chose the title “Will Saves for the Stars.” Is this a good title based on the evidence on the page? Why or why not?

2) What does Wise Pockets tell Will about earning and saving money? (pg. 19)

3) Read page 22. What is the connection between saving and spending? How will Will save money for his telescope?

4) Starting on page 30, do the quiz together as a class. Ask students to record some of the answers.

Alternate or Additional Text # 3:chair

Read: A Chair for my Mother by Vera B. Williams or watch/listen to a classroom-read version from School Tube

•Who is telling this story?  Site evidence to show how you know. R.L.1.6

•At the diner, what service does Rosa provide? SS.1.E.1.3

•What is Rosa given in exchange for her service? SS.1.E.1.1

•What good does Rosa’s family plan to purchase when they save enough money? SS.1.E.1.1

•What does the word bargain mean in this story?  RL.1.4

•What is the problem in this story? How was it solved?  RL1.5

• In the story, Mama says, “There’s no good place for me to take a load off my feet.”  What does she mean by this? RL.1.4

• Why was it important for Rosa and her family to save their money? SS.1.E.1.5

• If you were Rosa, and your home burned down, would you have saved all your money to buy your mother a chair?  Why or why not.  Site evidence from the story to support your argument.  W.1.1

R-Reporting options

Reporting, considered as a Performance Task, is an essential part of CCSS. The reporting must be tied to the essential question in a CSI-R lesson.

  1. Students work in pairs to create a talk show script. They create questions and answers about why it is important to save for future purchases. They cite evidence from text(s) in their interviews. After they write the scripts, they read/perform them as talk-show interviews. Video-tape the talk-shows so you can share with parents!
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CSI-R Kindergarten: People Work to Earn Money

In this lesson, created by Christine Joseph of Pinellas County, FL, and Deborah Kozdras of the USF Stavros Center, students learn how people work to earn money to buy things they need or want.

C– Choose your Content

Recognize –People work to earn money to buy things they need or want.

•Essential Question:

How do people make money?

Sample Disciplinary Vocabulary:   Money, needs, wants, buy, earn, income.

S-Select the Standards CCSS Standards for Literacy: RL.K.1, RL.K.2, WK.2

NGSSS Standards for Economics:   •SS.K.E.1.3 Recognize that people work to earn money to buy things they need or want.

I-Identify texts & text-dependent questions for Investigation

Learning About Earning Digital Text: Use this freely available digital text to conduct a read aloud to students.

While you read, ask the following text-dependent questions:

1) Heather has a problem. She received some money but doesn’t have enough money for her party. (p. 3). I wonder what she can do? (students can predict)

2) What did Wise Pockets tell Heather about money? (pg. 5). What does “income” mean, based on what Wise Pockets says?

3) What advice did Money Mouse give Heather to help her figure out how to earn money? (p. 9). Was this good advice? (read pages 10-11)

4) What did Heather decide to do? (page 12)

5) While you read through the quiz with students, record the facts they learned about earning money.

R-Reporting options

Reporting, considered as a Performance Task, is an essential part of CCSS. The reporting must be tied to the essential question in a CSI-R lesson.

  1. Fold the paper in two. On one side label the page “Heather’s Problem.” On the other side, label the page “Heather’s Solution.” Using the evidence gathered from the text  students draw a picture and write a sentence or two explaining Heather’s income problem on one side and solution to work to make money on the other side. Students should use some of the words from the text: income, money, work, earn, etc.
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CSI-R 3rd Grade: Currency – Alexander Used to be Rich . . .

In this lesson, created by Linda Jenkins of Pinellas County, FL, students learn how people interact to exchange goods and services.

C– Choose your Content

Recognize –People interact to exchange goods and services through the use of money.

•Essential Question:

Describe the interactions Alexander has with money in the story.

Sample Disciplinary Vocabulary:   Goods, Services, money, coins, bills, currency 

S-Select the Standards

CCSS Standards for Literacy: RL.3.1, RL.3.2, W3.2

NGSSS Standards for Economics:  

•3.E.1.2- Recognize that buyers and sellers interact to exchange goods and services through the use of trade or money

I-Identify texts & text-dependent questions for Investigation

Alexander Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday: Lexile level 570, Grade 3.5

alexander

Listen to the story read aloud

Scaffold Student Investigation Before, During, & After by conducting a Read Aloud/Think Aloud. Attend to the images and text when prompting students.

Sample Text-Dependent Questions:

•In the story, What dollars and coins does Alexander’s brother Anthony have in the beginning of the story

•What does the author tell us about Alexander’s brothers and how they manage their money?

•What suggestions did Alexander’s family make about how he should manage his money? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

•What did Alexander buy first? Based on what you know about Alexander’s goal for his money, is this a good or poor decision? Use details from the text to support your ideas.

R-Reporting options

Reporting, considered as a Performance Task, is an essential part of CCSS. The reporting must be tied to the essential question in a CSI-R lesson.

  1. Using the evidence gathered from the text  students create a timeline of Alexander’s exchanges using the ReadWriteThink Timeline Interactive.
  2. At each space in the timeline, students provide an explanation of how goods or services were exchanged for money.
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CSI-R for 5th Grade: Colonial Economics

Economics during Colonial Times: Grade 5

 Linda S. Brown & Nicole Beliveau, Pinellas County

CSI-R  Model:  Reading like a Detective & Writing like a Reporter

CONTENT:  What are you teaching?  Essential Question

 

What land/climate characteristics help define the type of economy of each region of the American colonies during the Colonial Period?

 

NGSSS Content Standards (chunking)

  • What were the economic motivations of significant individuals and groups for colonial settlements?
  • Identify how trade promoted economic growth in N.A. from pre-Columbian times to 1850.
  • Describe a market economy: give examples from colonial and early American economy.

 

STANDARDS:  CCSS standards & strategies as tools for learning.

Reading:

  1. 1.   Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  2. 3.  Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
  3. 9.  Integrate  information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

 

Writing:

      9.  Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

           b.  Apply grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and the evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point[s]”).

 

 

 

 

INVESTIGATION / INQUIRY: Texts for students to investigate.  Text-dependent questions to scaffold learning.

 

Close Reading Activity:

Economics during Colonial Times:  Specialization 

  • What kind of text is this? (digital text created by book builder)   Explain how you know. (C&S-4)(IK&I-7)
  • What is the important information given on the map of the Thirteen Colonies? (KI&D-2)
  • Look back at the text and see if you can divide it into parts.  What parts does the author include? (C&S-5)
  • Describe the use of the land for each colony group?  How did the land contribute to the economic success of the time? (IK&I-7)
  • Compare each colony group and explain if they were producers or not and why? (IK&I-9)

 

Chart:  Understanding how to read a table:

Specialization and Trade in the Thirteen Colonies Lesson 6

Visual 6.1  Great Britain’s American Colonies (chart)

Text:  Understanding the meaning of barter: 

“What Is Money?

Money, Banking & Monetary Policy – page 5   (Handout or booklet)

Website:  Students view additional information and identify important details to support essential question.

The Three Regions of the 13 Colonies

Powerpoint Presentation:  Students view additional information and identify important details to support essential question.

Life in the 13 Colonies

Game Activity:  13 Colonies Game  (2 students at a time)

Economics game board directions: optional (includes directions and map on card stock)

Cards to read to earn points:

Economic Game 1. Economic Game 2 Economic Game 3

 

Further study – Triangular Trade:

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and botanical Gardens Triangular Trade Grade 5:  United States History and Geography 

Interactive Trade Route Map

REPORT:  Student report to answer essential question.  Teacher report for evaluation of student learning.

 

Writing Performance Task:  Choose a region in which you think economic growth was the greatest.  Defend your response with details you pulled from the documents analyzed during this unit.

 

 

Additional Resources: 

Kalman, Bobbie, Historic Communities Colonial Crafts, Crabtree Publishing Company, 199

Kalman, Bobbie, Historic Communities Colonial Home, Crabtree Publishing Company, 2001

Kalman, Bobbie, Historic Communities A Colonial Town Williamsburg, Crabtree Publishing company, 1992

Kalman, Bobbie, Historic Communities Tools and Gadgets, Crabtree Publishing Company, 1992.

Knight, James E., Adventures in Colonial America – Jamestown New World Adventure, Troll Associates, 1982

Knight, James E., Adventures in Colonial America – The Village Life in Colonial Times, Troll Associates, 1982

Maestro, Betsy, The American Story Series-The New Americans Colonial Times – (1620-1689), Harper Trophy, 1998

Masoff, Joy, Chronicle of America Colonial Times 1600-1700, Scholastic, 2000

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E-DBQ for 4th Grade: Citrus Economics

Check out this new Micro E-DBQ created by Shelley Holder, Literacy Coach, Pinellas District

FLORIDA’S ECONOMY: THE IMPACT OF CITRUS MICRO-Q

HOOK

Show the class a large bowl full of citrus fruit and ask the question, “What do you think of when you hear the word ‘citrus’?” To demonstrate the relevance of citrus in the students’ everyday lives, you may wish to follow with “How many of you ate an orange or had a glass of orange juice or any other citrus products for breakfast?”

The State Beverage: Orange Juice

Whenever the words “orange juice” are read, written, or spoken, many people automatically think of Florida.

During the Second World War, scientists invented a process for making concentrated orange juice. Soon, a frozen concentrate was developed that transformed orange juice production into a multi-billion-dollar industry. In 1967 the Florida legislature designated orange juice as the official state beverage

http://www.flheritage.com/kids/symbol.cfm?id=14

Introductory Informational Text INVESTIGATION

1) If you own the MacMillan Social Studies little books on Citrus, use the texts/questions in these documentsMINI INFORMATIONAL TEXT QUESTIONING CITRUS ECONOMY

2) If you do not own the Macmillan Social Studies books on Citrus, use one or more of these informational texts from the Florida Center for Instructional Technology:

Introductory Informational Text REPORTING

Use some of the following questions to guide the reading of the texts. Record the student answers on a chart paper or have students keep notes during discussion. After discussion, have students create a rough written summary of the evidence and information they gathered through their reading of the introductory informational text.

Sourcing: What is the author’s point of view? Why was it written? When was it written? Is this source believable?

Contextualization: What else was going on at the time? What things were different back then? What was the same?

Close Reading: What claims does author make about the importance of Citrus to the Florida economy? What evidence is there to support claims? What did author leave out? What helps convince me author is right? How does this article make me feel about oranges and their importance to Florida?

Corroboration: How does this corroborate other evidence that Citrus is important for Florida? What pieces of evidence are believable?

Interesting Supplemental Primary Source Texts for INVESTIGATION

DOCUMENT A CITRUS ECONOMY

DOCUMENT B CITRUS ECONOMY

DOCUMENT C CITRUS INDUSTRY

DOCUMENT D CITRUS INDUSTRY

 DOCUMENT E CITRUS ECONOMY

Additional sources from FCIT Florida Social Studies:

Orange Song

Charming Florida

Stereoview Gallery of 3D Historical Photos/Postcards

Packing Oranges: Postcard

Historic Postcard of Citrus Exchange

CULMINATING WRITING TASK

Using the information you have recorded from the first informational text, in addition to what you read/viewed in DOCUMENTS A-E (and/or other documents provided) develop a piece of writing to describe how the citrus industry has impacted Florida’s economy over time.  Be sure to site evidence from the DOCUMENTS in your writing.  Keep in mind your writing should follow chronological order. Use a timeline as a graphic organizer to plan your writing. You may choose to add images, graphs, or charts to enhance your writing. You can provide your answer in written form or as part of a slide show or documentary.

OR

If you were a citrus farm owner, compose a letter to a friend that lives in the North, and describe how the citrus industry has changed over time and how it has affected you and the economy. Use the ReadWriteThink Letter Generator to help you organize the structure of your letter.

 

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